Liminality

Liminality in anthropological terms is the disorientation and ambiguity that occurs in the middle stage of a ritual. It’s the transitory process of someone who no longer belongs to a pre-ritual status but has not yet reached the status that will hold when the ritual is complete.

My liminality has been very intense and often frustrating – I guess it always is. I was on the borderline, I came to Kenya as a tourist, I was willing to be an anthropologist and I ended up being a volunteer. I prefer to think differently now, and not try to fall into a category. Whatever I was it made my experience unique and life-changing.

Pre-Ritual status: The tourist

I arrived in Nairobi on Sunday and moved to Mlolongo with Tom and Winnie the day after. Even though I was staying in a non-touristic area and in an unconventional accommodation I spent the first five days as a tourist: I visited a couple of museums in Nairobi, enjoyed a trip to Lake Naivasha with hippos, eagles and flamingos, visited the US embassy that has been blown up in ’98, went to the seaside near Mombasa and spent a lot of money in food and transports.

Thomas was my guide, our deal was that he would have shown me the central highlands area for a week in exchange of $200 and all the expenses –food, travel and accommodation. We immediately became good friends and agreed that all the saving we could make on a $600 budget will have gone in his wallet.

It turned out that he was renting a house in Bamburi, Mombasa therefore we decided to move to the coast on Thursday 19th of July. The 8 hours bus ride was very comfortable and the bus had a big screen showing funny African comedians; I’ve noted a joke on my notebook and stumbled upon it this morning. A Kenyan comedian called Pablo was talking about Kisumu where Obama is originally from. “Do you know what O.B.A.M.A. really Means?” He asked the crowd…

“One Black African Managing America!” I thought that was kind of funny… Wait, don’t forget about his name: “Barack: Born African Raised American Certainly Kenyan”.

We arrived in Mombasa at 7pm and after a 40minutes tuc-tuc ride we got to Bamburi. It was getting dark and most of the places look very dodgy when it’s dark. Tom was telling me that this particular district is less dangerous than Nairobi but you still need to be careful if you are white and people don’t know you. It happened that a Muzungu –white man- was given drugs with food and robbed. I was already pretty scared and when we got to the house there was no electricity, a strong odor and it was infested by cockroaches. I wanted to die.

Tom, who studied electrical engineer, went to fix the fuse while I was left alone in this beautiful scenery. Luckily my girlfriend called me and I had the opportunity to moan with someone and get some comfort.

One hour later the electricity was fixed and we went with some Muslim neighbors to celebrate the last night out before Ramadan kicked in.

On Friday we went to Bamburi Beach all day with the same friends and when we got back we watched a movie; I can’t remember the title but there is a quotation that really helped me changing mindset and coping with the first cultural shocks: “It’s all in the mind. Your vision creates your reality”.

I wasn’t enjoying being a tourist a lot and I think Tom realized I was looking for something more.

___

Today is Sunday and Winnie came to visit us. She doesn’t know about the house yet, it’s going to be a great surprise! She’s now waiting outside the cybercafe, I don’t have time to finish this post! Damn!

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