Tag Archives: Mijikenda

Back to primary school

Tom has nine sibilings, the youngest is called Emmanuel and is attending the fourth year of primary school.Yesterday, while taking a break from the house building works, I followed him to school.

We walked for ten minutes on this road and finally reached Tezo Primary School.

There are 113 students and 4 teachers at Tezo Primary School. The first impression was really great, the children were playing football and as I approached the field everyone stopped and looked at me astonished.

I’m so grateful to have adventured myself on this road, these people are so enthusiastic and full of joy!

Tomorrow I’m going back to school, 10 o’clock English class and 2 o’clock Science. I will teach children in the fifth year how to use reported speech and why liquid expands when warmed up! It’s going to be exciting!

I also have a lot of projects that relates to Anthropology and the headmaster, Mr. Kaengo, gave me total freedom to carry out any kind of research.

I wasn’t expecting so many things to happen in such a short time. If you read this and you know something about anthropology and ethnography please leave a comment, I need your help! I have some ideas but when it comes to make them happen it’s not always easy so, I’m open to suggestions.

Last night I was talking to Tom and I had a great idea. In order to get an insight on their lives I would like to organize a writing/anthropology workshop where the students in the fifth grade will have the chance to learn how to draw a genealogy tree (all of them have at least 7 siblings) and to tell stories of their relatives. I will gain a lot of useful information about the tribes they come from and they will get the chance to practice their writing skills. I’ll probably need to buy some pens and A4 paper.

I am also tempted to give to some of them my camera and find out more about indigenous media.

I’m going to the beach now, this afternoon we’re hiring a lorry and move a sofa to the new house. I will finally move all my stuff to Kilifi!

Few pictures of the neighborhood:

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Take care,

Marco

Building the house – Day 1

Things have turned out REALLY well for me.

Thomas and I have rented a house in Kilifi just one kilometer away from the beach. We have fixed the motorbike and we have bought enough cement to build a 4 bedrooms house.

I know for sure that the handshake we gave when I offered him some funding for the house was more than a business agreement. I have found a great friend that calls me brother, I’ve been welcomed by his family like the tenth son and I live in a place that is a paradise to me.

I first visited Kilifi Tezo, 7 kilometers in the hinterland forest, on Saturday 20th of July and I decided that if something had to be done there was no time to waste. We paid the neighbours 1.000 Ksh (£8) and when I arrived on Sunday morning people were busy digging the soil to remove all the weeds that accumulated in one year.

When I think of cheap labor I immediately think of exploitation and poverty. Paying such a small amount of money to make four people work eight hours  is a crime. With the Mijikendas is different; “It’s cheap labor because is home” Thomas once told me and what he meant was “Welcome, this is my community where we help each other and there’s no need to rely on money”.

This is what the plot looked like after a day of weed-cutting, the L shaped piece of ground you see on the right will be the guest room one day. We have enough cement to complete the house but we will probably need some more blocks; I’m planning to come back in December to do some research and keep working on the house.

On Monday we arrived early in Tezo and we helped the fundi (experienced builder) to make the cement. After a day of work the walls of two bedrooms were done.

 

The following weeks will be very interesting.